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  #11  
Old June 30th, 2011
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"As HIV Turns 30, Attention Turns to an Aging Epidemic" blog.AIDS.gov 30 June 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/06/as-hiv-...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
HIV Policy & Programs June 30, 2011

As HIV Turns 30, Attention Turns to an Aging Epidemic

By Michael Adams, Executive Director, Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE)

The opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official positions or policies of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or other Federal agencies.

Just two months before the 30th anniversary of the first reported cases of HIV in the United States, the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations (LCAO Exit Disclaimer)—a network of national aging organizations—released its official recommendations for the upcoming reauthorization of the Older Americans Act, the country’s primary vehicle for delivering services to older people at the local level.

Addressing Needs of Older Americans Living with HIV
At the urging of SAGE, in partnership with several diverse aging and HIV organizations, the LCAO is promoting seven recommendations to include lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders in the provisions of the Older Americans Act, and a critically important recommendation to help address the needs of older people living with HIV. LCAO is encouraging the federal government to address the service needs of “the growing number of older adults living with HIV and the related health disparities, discrimination and stigma.”

Why are these recommendations happening now? Our country is witnessing two major demographic shifts. First, as a large wave of Baby Boomers begins entering retirement age, we’re concurrently seeing larger and larger numbers of “out” LGBT older people. Second, thanks to the medical advances in HIV-related treatment, many people who have HIV/AIDS are living longer lives—and, thus, the “graying” of HIV in this country.

Today, approximately 28% of people living with HIV in the U.S. are over 50. By 2017 that number is projected to grow to 50%. In addition, it is estimated that 15% of all new HIV infections occur in people over 50. And the available data clearly documents that the AIDS epidemic has disproportionately affected men who have sex with men, gay and bisexual men, people of color and transgender people—of all ages, including elders. More than 1,000 diagnoses of HIV infection were reported among MSM age 55 and older each year from 2006-2009, according to CDC data (PDF 260KB).

Trends Creating Greater Health Risks for Older Adults
As a direct service provider with a long history of supporting LGBT older people living with HIV/AIDS, SAGE is deeply concerned about the severe challenges that face our elders. For example, in one study, 80% of LGBT older people with HIV lived alone, compared to 67% of older heterosexuals living with HIV[1]. We know from our experience working with LGBT older people living with HIV that the harmful effects of such social isolation include depression, poor nutrition and premature mortality. In addition, fear of discrimination often prevents LGBT elders from seeking the health care they need until it is too late, which means they can first present with advanced HIV infection (i.e., AIDS) leading to worse health outcomes. And, too often, HIV prevention messages ignore LGBT older people or assume that older people are not sexually active. Together, these trends create greater health risks for older adults.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration on Aging addressed some of these issues in their special webinar, Positive Aging: HIV Turns 30. The webinar, featuring Kathy Greenlee, Assistant Secretary for Aging at HHS, and SAGE’s Doreen Bermudez, among others, focused on educating the Aging Network about HIV prevention and treatment specific to older adults. If you were not able to participate live, please consider viewing the archive, available at AoA’s Older Adults and HIV/AIDS webpage. The National Institute on Aging at NIH also has an Age Page on HIV, AIDS and Older People.

As we reflect on the past 30 years of the AIDS epidemic and its impact on the LGBT community, SAGE is focused on working with partners across the aging and HIV fields, and government, to address the needs of older people living with HIV, many of whom are LGBT. Solutions to these issues include improved research and data collection on older people living with HIV; prevention messages that target elders of all sexual orientations and gender identities; more programs that acknowledge and address the fact that LGBT older people and/or older adults living with HIV often have inadequate support from their communities or families of origin; and training, such as that offered by SAGE’s National Resource Center on LGBT Aging Exit Disclaimer, for aging services and healthcare providers about the unique needs of elders living with HIV/AIDS.

These are only the first steps to improving the quality of life for older people living with HIV. But they’re critically important ones.

How are issues related to HIV and aging being addressed in your community? Share your observations or recommendations in the Comments section below.

Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) is the country’s largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBT older adults. SAGE has pioneered programs and services for the aging LGBT community, provided technical assistance and training to expand opportunities for LGBT older people across the country, and provided a national voice on LGBT aging issues. In 2010, SAGE was awarded a three-year $900,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Administration on Aging to seed the creation of the nation’s only National Resource Center on LGBT Aging.

[1] Karpiak, S.E. & Brennan, M. (2009). The emerging population of older adults with HIV and introduction to ROAH the research study. In Brennan, M., Karpiak, S.E., Shippy, R.A., & Cantor, M.H., Older Americans with HIV: An In-depth Examination of an Emerging Population.

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, LGBTQ Health
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  #12  
Old July 18th, 2011
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"Scientific Advances and the Fight Against AIDS" blog.AIDS.gov 18 July 2011.

By Eric Goosby. Lots of homage to PEPFAR, but no mention of circumcision.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/07/scienti...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
Scientific Advances and the Fight Against AIDS

By Eric Goosby, Ambassador, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (Cross-posted from State Department Blog)

This week, I am in Rome, Italy, for the International AIDS Society’s Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention. This gathering of researchers caps a year of incredible scientific announcements, and I anticipate even more at this meeting.

Last summer, the PEPFAR-funded CAPRISA study of a tenofovir-based microbicide demonstrated successful proof-of-concept for this female controlled prevention method. The study showed that women using the microbicide gel had an average of 39 percent fewer HIV infections and 51 percent fewer genital herpes infections compared to women who used a placebo gel. The results of this study were clear evidence of the importance of U.S. investments — across multiple agencies — in microbicides. And through PEPFAR, our country teams will be working to create the regulatory path and client demand for these products when they are ready to be marketed, so that this innovation can be quickly brought to bear in order to save lives.

In May, a National Institute of Health (NIH) randomized control trial confirmed earlier observational evidence and clearly documented that treatment also worked as an extraordinarily effective tool for the prevention of sexual HIV transmission. Initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) by HIV-infected individuals substantially protected their HIV-uninfected sexual partners from acquiring HIV, with an astonishing 96 percent reduction in risk of HIV transmission. By lowering the viral load of HIV, ART greatly reduces the risk of sexual transmission of HIV to an uninfected partner.

And just this week, two studies have confirmed an initial proof-of-concept trial demonstrating the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV infection. In these studies, individuals taking a daily tenofivor or tenofovir/ emtricitabine combination experienced infection rates more than 60 percent lower than those on a placebo. This finding further advances potential options in prevention for couples where one partner is infected with HIV and for other high-risk populations.

I expect additional innovations to be announced at this meeting, creating momentum around “what’s possible” in fighting HIV/AIDS. Nearly a decade after the creation of PEPFAR and the Global Fund helped begin to restore hope to hard-hit nations, these new research achievements are bringing a second wave of hope to communities impacted by AIDS. They are creating a mood of optimism and promise as we turn our attention to next year’s International AIDS Society meeting in Washington, D.C.

Many of these advances have benefited from the funding and expertise found throughout the U.S. government. They have the potential to radically change the way we think about HIV/AIDS in the developing world, and help to prevent millions of new infections worldwide. We will work with the World Health Organization and others as they develop the normative guidance that will allow us to partner with countries to translate these scientific findings into effective, lifesaving programs.

In order for us to fulfill the promise of these findings, we will continue to foster shared responsibility among all parties. We will continue to work with our partners in national and local governments, enabling them to create the policies and systems that allow innovations to be rapidly implemented and scaled up at the country level. We need to work with ministries of finance and other donors to coordinate and complement financing, so that we get the maximum life-saving impact for every dollar spent. And we will continue to make sure that these efforts build upon and help to strengthen the health systems that deliver care in the developing world.

It’s a tall order, but I believe we can achieve amazing things over the next few years. I am honored to lead a program that is at the forefront of putting scientific advances into practice to save lives, and look forward to reporting back from Rome.

Posted in: Global, PEPFAR Updates
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  #13  
Old July 22nd, 2011
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"Engaging Businesses in Support of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy" blog.AIDS.gov 22 July 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/07/engagin...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
Engaging Businesses in Support of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

By James Albino, Senior Program Manager, Office of National AIDS Policy

Successfully achieving the National HIV/AIDS Strategy’s aggressive goals depends not only on Federal leadership, but also on new investments and new partnerships from all parts society, including the private sector. As my colleague Melody Barnes, the President’s Domestic Policy Adviser, noted in a prior post, we know that some of our biggest successes in fighting HIV/AIDS have come about because of private sector initiatives, so we have called on businesses and foundations to provide that next level of leadership by stepping up their efforts in a few targeted areas. Many have responded, from hairdressers and L’Oreal to the Here Media Exit Disclaimer and LOGO TV Exit Disclaimer, two of the world’s largest media companies reaching the gay community.

Another significant example unfolded earlier this year when Levi Strauss & Co. announced Exit Disclaimer new Terms of Engagement for its global supply chain to help improve the lives of workers in factories around the world. Under the new approach, the company will require contract factories to help make employees’ lives better by supporting programs for their workers that align with UN Millennium Development Exit Disclaimer goals. These include priorities such as eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, improving maternal and child health, and fighting HIV/AIDS and other diseases, among others. The move by Levi Strauss & Co. is a reminder of the critically important roles that the private sector plays in addressing critical challenges faced domestically and abroad.

What Businesses of All Sizes Can Do

Achieving the Strategy’s goals of reducing new HIV infections, increasing access to care, and reducing health disparities, will require the support of businesses of all sizes. While Levis efforts are laudable for their global impact, so, too, are the efforts of small “mom and pop” businesses and businesses of all sizes of in between. In addition to the targeted areas of action identified in Melody’s post, the private sector can contribute to efforts underway across the nation to achieve the Strategy’s goals by:

* Lending financial and volunteer support to a local AIDS service organization, many of which are facing challenges in meeting the continuing demand for services in an environment of constrained resources.
* Providing education to employees designed to prevent HIV-related stigma and discrimination and raise awareness about HIV risk reduction.
* Ensuring that their HR policies make the workplace friendly for persons with HIV/AIDS and their loved ones. Due to medical breakthroughs, many people with HIV continue to work or seek employment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in six large U.S. worksites (more than 50 employees) and one in 16 small U.S. worksites (fewer than 50 employees) have experienced an employee with HIV/AIDS.
* Encouraging and fostering collaboration among other business and labor organizations to broaden the depth and breadth of support for HIV activities in the community.

We hope that many interested businesses will step forward and work together with Federal, state and local governments to help end the HIV epidemic.

What is your business doing to address HIV/AIDS in your community? What opportunities do you see for businesses to support the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy? Share your ideas in the Comments section below.

For other ideas on what businesses can do and some related resources, visit CDC’s Business Responds to AIDS Exit Disclaimer web site. The Business Responds to AIDS/Labor Responds to AIDS (BRTA/LRTA) program is a public/private partnership that strategically promotes and assists the involvement of business and labor in HIV prevention, awareness and policies in the workplace to promote the development of comprehensive workplace HIV/AIDS programs.

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, National HIV/AIDS Strategy
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  #14  
Old July 28th, 2011
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"Federal Leads Review Progress at One-Year Anniversary" blog.AIDS.gov 27 July 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/07/federal...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
Federal Leads Review Progress at One-Year Anniversary

By Ronald Valdiserri, M.D., M.P.H., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Infectious Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

On the eve of the first anniversary of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS), representatives of the six federal agencies tasked by the President with lead responsibility for implementing NHAS gathered for one of our regular meetings and shared updates on implementation progress. Chairing the meeting, the Assistant Secretary for Health, Dr. Howard Koh, praised the participants for the progress being made within and across Departments and for the personal dedication of each of these representatives to bringing the Strategy to life not only within their respective agencies, but also across the nation.

During the meeting, the agency representatives each highlighted some of the significant recent activities underway in pursuit of the Strategy’s goals. These included:

Department of Housing and Urban Development – Among the several activities underway at HUD, according to Mr. David Vos, Director of the Office of HIV/AIDS Housing, are preparations for an upcoming roundtable for faith- and community-based organizations in the mid-Atlantic area that will focus on successful collaborations to provide housing and supportive services to low-income households with a person living with HIV and AIDS, and will to promote understanding to combat stigma and discrimination. HUD is also conducting cross-training with the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Ryan White program project officers at HHS to ensure all share a solid and common knowledge base about HIV/AIDS programs in other departments.

Department of Justice – The DOJ’s Civil Rights Division has developed a subsite within ADA.gov to address civil rights issues related to HIV/AIDS, including the ability to file a discrimination claim online. The office is also preparing an update to its “bench book” for judges regarding HIV/AIDS and civil rights law, according to Ms. Allison Nichol, Chief of the Disability Rights Section of the Department’s Civil Rights Division. CAPT Chris Bina, Pharm.D., reported that the Department’s Federal Bureau of Prisons continues to offer universal HIV testing to all inmates sentenced to a federal facility. The Bureau also recently updated and released its National HIV Practice Guidelines and is preparing a seminar for the system’s healthcare providers about them. CAPT Bina also noted that the Bureau is sharing its best practices regarding both healthcare for inmates with HIV and facilitating linkages to care for HIV positive ex-offenders re-entering the community with their colleagues who administer state and local jails, where the majority of the nation’s prisoners are incarcerated.

Department of Labor – A recent DOL-convened roundtable explored how to improve employment opportunities and outcomes and reduce stigma and discrimination for people living with HIV/AIDS, reported Mr. Dylan Orr, Special Assistant/Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy. In an effort to better coordinate related federal efforts, many of the other lead federal agencies were involved in the roundtable (including the Departments of Justice, Housing and Urban Development, and Health and Human Services, and the Social Security Administration) as well as the Equal Opportunity Commission, the Department of Education, the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and a number of HIV/AIDS service providers, employers, disability employment advocates, and members of the HIV/AIDS community. On another front, DOL’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has launched a system for prioritizing and fast-tracking investigations of employment discrimination complaints based on HIV/AIDS status. OFCCP has also developed public education materials on employment rights under Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act with emphasis on HIV/AIDS employment discrimination. These materials have been distributed to OFCCP’s field offices and will also be distributed to stakeholders and community groups.

Department of Veterans Affairs – VA’s Dr. Maggie Czarnogorski, Deputy Director, Clinical Public Health Program, reported the Department’s ongoing effort to increase HIV testing among veterans. Based on recently analyzed data, the VA had a 140 percent increase in HIV tests from 2009 to 2010 with over 350,000 tests conducted in 2010. To continue these expanded testing activities, VA has provided grants to 20 VA facilities to expand HIV laboratory testing and is offering an electronic clinical prompt that reminds providers to offer an HIV test, integrating HIV testing into more than 20 Stand Downs for homeless veterans, and capturing and sharing best practices related to HIV testing throughout its network. It is also supporting and working closely with 10 women veterans health programs and preparing to launch a social marketing campaign to promote HIV testing among veterans later this year.

Social Security Administration – The SSA is working to expedite claims identifying HIV/AIDS as the primary qualification, according to Mr. David Rust, Deputy Commissioner for Retirement and Disability Policy. The agency’s entry for HIV/AIDS in the listing of impairments is being updated after over a year of work that included consultations with the community and the Institute of Medicine. Mr. Rust also observed that SSA is working with the Department of Labor on employment opportunities for beneficiaries through its “Ticket to Work” program.

Department of Health and Human Services – Mr. Michael Evanson of the HRSA’s HIV/AIDS Bureau reported on the agency’s recent update to policies governing the use of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program funds for housing referral services and short-term or emergency housing needs. He concurred with HUD’s David Vos that HHS and HUD will need to work together to help all grantees understand the new policy and what is allowed and required. I also noted that other HHS agencies and offices will be highlighting examples and reflections on their NHAS implementation progress via blog posts and on their web sites.

We also shared with our colleagues from across the government that simultaneous to implementing the NHAS, HHS is also working to implement the recently released Action Plan for the Prevention, Care and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis. This new effort is significant for our federal partners since up to 30 percent of persons living with HIV are co-infected with hepatitis and both infections share commonalities around transmission, so our efforts on either will impact both.

Several of the participants observed that another measure of progress in this first year of collectively pursuing the Strategy’s goals has been the continuation of these regular cross-departmental conversations. Each of our quarterly meetings has offered opportunities for cross-pollinating ideas and engaging in both collaborative and complementary efforts aligned with the Strategy. As each of the lead federal agencies presses forward with its own efforts to implement the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, we will all continue to identify and leverage cross-agency collaborative opportunities that are as yet untapped to ensure better coordination of efforts at all levels and, most importantly, improved outcomes.

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, National HIV/AIDS Strategy
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Old July 29th, 2011
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"White House Commemorates World Hepatitis Day 2011" blog.AIDS.gov 28 July 2011.

Valdiserri continuing to link hepatitis with HIV.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/07/white-h...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
White House Commemorates World Hepatitis Day 2011

By Ronald Valdiserri, M.D., M.P.H., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Infectious Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Cross-posted from White House Office of National AIDS Policy Blog)

Today, I was honored to participate in a special White House event to commemorate the first official World Hepatitis Day. This event was one of many held across the United States and around the world for communities to join together and focus attention on the global health threat of viral hepatitis and promote actions to confront it.

Worldwide, one in twelve persons are estimated to be living with viral hepatitis and about one million people around the world die every year because of viral hepatitis. Many people infected with viral hepatitis are unaware of their status, and as a result, may unknowingly transmit the infection to others. Without knowing their status, these patients also face the possibility of developing otherwise preventable debilitating or fatal liver disease. Last year, in recognition of this “silent epidemic,” the World Health Assembly resolved that July 28 should be designated as World Hepatitis Day, providing an opportunity to increase awareness and understanding of viral hepatitis and recognize it as a major global health problem. The theme for this first official World Hepatitis Dayis “This is hepatitis… Know it. Confront it. Hepatitis affects everyone, everywhere.”

In the United States, an estimated 3.5-5.3 million persons are living with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus. Viral hepatitis impacts Americans of all backgrounds but affects some U.S. populations more than others. Half of all hepatitis B infected persons in the U.S. are Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders; African-Americans are twice as likely to be infected with hepatitis C when compared with the general population. To actively address these disparities and to accelerate our efforts to fight viral hepatitis, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) developed an Action Plan for the Prevention, Care and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis. The plan outlines actions to increase viral hepatitis awareness and knowledge among health care providers and communities, and steps that will improve access to quality prevention, care, and treatment services for viral hepatitis. Improved coordination across HHS, along with the active engagement of other governmental and nongovernmental partners—including informed communities—will be crucial to our success.

Today’s World Hepatitis Day Event was hosted by the White House Office of National AIDS Policy with active support from the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. Dr. Howard K. Koh, the Assistant Secretary for Health, emphasized that marking this day in such a special way provides an opportunity to reaffirm our collective commitment to focus more attention on this pressing public health issue. Dr. Koh was among the dignitaries who provided opening remarks at the event and read a World Hepatitis Day proclamation on behalf of President Obama. I was pleased to then hear from several members of Congress, including Representatives Bill Cassidy, Judy Chu, Michael Honda, Hank Johnson, and Barbara Lee, who have been leaders in raising hepatitis awareness. I moderated a panel that highlighted opportunities across the federal government to implement the HHS Action Plan for Viral Hepatitis. This discussion was followed by a session led by health care providers and patients living with viral hepatitis who shared their individual experiences with fighting viral hepatitis. Mr. Jeffrey Crowley, Director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, provided a closing statement to the audience, which included government leaders, policy makers, community advocates, patients, and health professionals.

To learn more about World Hepatitis Day or about viral hepatitis visit the CDC’s website. Also, read the Presidential Proclamation–World Hepatitis Day.

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, Viral Hepatitis
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Old August 1st, 2011
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"Congressional Briefing on the Anniversary of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy" blog.AIDS.gov 1 August 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/08/congres...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
Congressional Briefing on the Anniversary of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

By Ronald Valdiserri, M.D., M.P.H., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Infectious Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

On the one-year anniversary of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy last week, I joined Mr. Jeffrey Crowley, Director of the White House Office on National AIDS Policy (ONAP), Dr. Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for Health, and several colleagues from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) at a Congressional briefing organized by Congresswoman Barbara Lee (CA-9th). The Congresswoman and several of her colleagues marked the anniversary with praise for the Strategy but pressed us to persevere with the challenging work necessary to achieve the Strategy’s 2015 goals for reducing new HIV infections, increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

AIDS.gov caught up with Dr. Koh right after the briefing and he shares some reflections on it in this brief video:


Joining Mr. Crowley, Dr. Koh, and me were HHS colleagues Ms. Caya Lewis, Chief of Staff at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and Dr. Jonathan Mermin, Director of CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. After we presented a brief update on implementation progress, the Members of Congress posed some questions and shared observations. Among the issues they raised were:

* Reporting on the effectiveness of the implementation of the Strategy
* The importance of translating the lessons learned from the 12 Cities Project to communities across the country for the widest possible benefit.
* Concern regarding the rising number of HIV cases in the Southern states and among women of color
* Preparations for convening of the AIDS 2012 Exit Disclaimer, the world’s largest HIV/AIDS conference which will be held in Washington, DC, in July of 2012

Congresswoman Lee remarked “Working closely with the White House and my colleagues in Congress to develop a comprehensive, domestic effort, I am pleased to see the strategy is becoming an effective vehicle to improve the national response to an epidemic that continues to devastate communities across the country. Though we still have a ways to go to ensure we reach all communities affected by the epidemic. I look forward to working with my colleagues toward achieving the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy.”

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, National HIV/AIDS Strategy
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Old August 13th, 2011
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"Achieving the Goals of the NHAS for Women" blog.AIDS.gov 12 August 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/08/achievi...og.AIDS.gov%29

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Achieving the Goals of the NHAS for Women
New Media August 12, 2011

By Vera Yakovchenko, Public Health Advisor, Office of HIV/AIDS Policy, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

One-fourth of Americans living with HIV are women. In the United States, the disease disproportionately impacts women of color: The HIV infection rate among Black women is 15 times that of white women and the rate among Hispanic women is more than four times that of white women, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Further, women and men have different biological, psychological, and cultural factors that increase their vulnerability to infection and disease progression. Achieving the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) will require addressing the unique HIV prevention, care and treatment needs of women in the United States. With that in mind, I wanted to share a number of recent events that will help move all of us closer to achieving the goals of the NHAS for women in America.

HIV Testing and Counseling Included in Women’s Preventive Health Services Guidelines
Last week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced historic new guidelines that will ensure women receive preventive health services, including HIV testing and counseling, at no additional cost. Developed by the independent Institute of Medicine, the new guidelines require new health insurance plans to cover women’s preventive services such as well-woman visits, breastfeeding support, domestic violence screening, and contraception– without charging a co-payment, co-insurance or a deductible. Under these guidelines, sexually active women will have access to annual screening and counseling on HIV (and sexually transmitted infections (STIs)). This is an important step toward making HIV screening a routine part of health care, as recommended by the CDC, and will bring us closer to identifying the 21 percent of people who are HIV-infected, but do not know it. New health plans will need to include these services without cost sharing for insurance policies with plan years beginning on or after August 1, 2012.

White House and HHS Consultations on Women and HIV/AIDS
Late last month, both the White House Office of National AIDS Policy and the Department of Health and Human Services convened consultations on efforts to address HIV/AIDS among American women. At the White House meeting, Jeffrey Crowley, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP), and Tina Tchen, Chief of Staff to the First Lady and Executive Director of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and senior HHS officials met with a group of women concerned about HIV/AIDS from across the nation. During this meeting, the group heard from representatives of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), CDC, and the Health Services and Resources Administration’s (HRSA) Ryan White AIDS program about activities underway in each agency that specifically focus on the prevention, care, and treatment needs of women living with or at risk for HIV.

The following day, a larger group of women, gathered for a meeting convened by the HHS Office on Women’s Health, one of the 14 core public health offices under the direction of the Assistant Secretary for Health. During the day-long meeting, participants dialogued about the impact of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy on women and girls and had the opportunity to share their thoughts with the Deputy Assistant Secretaries of Health for both Women’s Health and Infectious Diseases. In addition, representatives of CDC, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS), NIH, HRSA, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) discussed how their HIV/AIDS portfolios are responding to the epidemic in women and what future directions they are considering. Themes that emerged from both meetings were: the importance of integrating sexual and reproductive health with HIV/AIDS efforts; the need for age-appropriate comprehensive sexuality education across the lifespan; and the need to identify and share emerging trends in new HIV infections among women so that partners across sectors can tailor responsive interventions quickly.

NHAS Implementation Update Features Several Achievements Benefiting Women
The brief National HIV/AIDS Strategy Implementation Update—released last month by the White House on the one-year anniversary of the President’s release of the Strategy—highlighted several key first-year achievements specifically relevant to addressing HIV among women. These included:

* The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of a fourth generation HIV diagnostic test that allows for earlier detection of HIV. The new test is approved for use with pregnant women and, if properly administered, can help identify HIV infection and reduce its transmission during pregnancy.
* Announcements from NIH of several successful groundbreaking studies that have significant implications for women. Of particular note are the CAPRISA 004 findings, which demonstrated successful proof-of-concept for a female controlled prevention method in the form of a microbicide gel that reduces the risk of HIV infection in HIV-negative women.

Promising Recent HIV Prevention Clinical Trial Results
In addition, to the CAPRISA study, two more clinical trials recently announced promising findings with specific relevance for HIV prevention among women. The results from the NIH-supported HPTN 052 study were the first from a major randomized clinical trial to indicate that treating an HIV-infected individual can reduce the risk of sexual transmission of HIV to an uninfected partner. Then, the recently announced findings of the TDF2 study, conducted by CDC in partnership with the Botswana Ministry of Health, found that a once-daily pill containing two anti-HIV drugs reduced the risk of acquiring HIV infection among uninfected individuals exposed to the virus through heterosexual sex. The strategy of providing daily oral antiretroviral drugs to uninfected individuals prior to HIV exposure is called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.

HHS Launches Updated Women and HIV Web Content
Finally, the NHAS calls on all of us to “educate all Americans about the threat of HIV and how to prevent it.” In support of that goal, the HHS Office on Women’s Health has recently updated and re-launched the Women and HIV/AIDS pages on womenshealth.gov, the Department’s online information source on a broad range of women’s health issues. The site covers topics including women’s risk for HIV, preventing HIV infection, getting tested for HIV, living with HIV, and HIV/AIDS research and clinical trials for women. I encourage you to visit the site to learn more and to join our efforts to educate more Americans about HIV/AIDS by sharing the site with friends and family members.

Ultimately, for the Strategy to be truly successful for women—and for all Americans—we need your support! The Strategy isn’t about what government can do alone. We need individuals—like you—as well as organizations and communities to complement federal activities with their own strategic steps aligned with the Strategy’s priorities. What actions are you or your organization taking to address HIV education, testing, prevention and/or care for women? Please share your thoughts and join the discussion in the Comments section below.

Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, National HIV/AIDS Strategy
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Default Re: Misc. HIV/AIDS government pronouncements & stuff.

"New CDC Resources on HIV Among Women and Transgender People" blog.AIDS.gov 24 August 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/08/new-cdc...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
New CDC Resources on HIV Among Women and Transgender People
HIV Policy & Programs August 24, 2011

By Miguel Gomez, AIDS.gov Director

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently posted new resources on two important HIV prevention topics:

HIV among womenUpdated Fact Sheet: HIV among Women – According to 2009 HIV surveillance data, women represented 24% of all diagnoses of HIV infection among U.S. adults and adolescents in 40 states with long-established, confidential name-based reporting. In 2008, an estimated 25% of adults and adolescents living with HIV infection were female.

HIV among transgenderNew Topic: HIV among Transgender People – Transgender communities in the United States are among the groups at highest risk for HIV infection.

Both are available as web pages as well as formatted in PDF for download and printing.

Posted in: CDC, HIV Policy & Programs, LGBTQ Health
"HIV among Women"

http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/women/

Quote:
According to 2009 HIV surveillance data, women1 represented 24% of all diagnoses of HIV infection among United States (US) adults and adolescents in 40 states with long-established, confidential name-based reporting. In 2008, an estimated 25% of adults and adolescents living with HIV infection were female. Black and Latina women are disproportionately affected at all stages of HIV infection compared with women of other races/ethnicities.
The Numbers

New HIV Infections2

In 2009, there were an estimated 11,200 new HIV infections among women in the United States. That year, women comprised 51% of the US population and 23% of those newly infected with HIV.

* Of the total number of new HIV infections in US women in 2009, 57% occurred in blacks, 21% were in whites, and 16% were in Hispanics/Latinas.
* In 2009, the rate of new HIV infections among black women was 15 times that of white women, and over 3 times the rate among Hispanic/Latina women.

HIV and AIDS Diagnoses3 and Deaths

* At some point in her lifetime, 1 in 139 women will be diagnosed with HIV infection. Black and Hispanic/Latina women are at increased risk of being diagnosed with HIV infection (1 in 32 black women and 1 in 106 Hispanic/Latina women will be diagnosed with HIV, compared with 1 in 182 Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander women; 1 in 217 American Indian/Alaska Native women; and 1 in 526 for both white and Asian women).
* From 2006 through 2009, estimated diagnoses of HIV infection among women decreased from 10,851 to 9,973. It is unknown whether this decrease is due to an actual decrease in new HIV infections (incidence) or whether the decrease reflects HIV testing trends.
* Women accounted for more than 25% of the estimated 34,247 AIDS diagnoses in 2009 and represent nearly 20% of cumulative AIDS diagnoses (including children) in the United States to date. There were 8,647 AIDS diagnoses among women in 2009 compared with 9,639 AIDS diagnoses among women in 2006.
* For women living with a diagnosis of HIV infection, the most common methods of transmission were high-risk heterosexual contact6 and injection drug use.
* In 2008, 4,796 (28%) of the estimated 17,374 persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection who died in the 40 states and 5 US dependent areas were women. Deaths attributed to HIV among women of color are disproportionately high: from 2000–2007, HIV infection was among the top 10 leading causes of death for black females aged 10–54 and Hispanic/Latina females aged 15–54.

Prevention Challenges

Like other affected populations, women face a number of risk factors that may contribute to their risk for HIV infection.

* Most women are infected with HIV through heterosexual sex. Some women become infected because they may be unaware of a male partner’s risk factors for HIV infection or have a lack of HIV knowledge and lower perception of risk. Relationship dynamics also play a role. For example, some women may not insist on condom use because they fear that their partner will physically abuse or leave them.
* Both unprotected vaginal and anal sex pose a risk for HIV transmission. Unprotected anal sex presents an even greater risk for HIV transmission for women than unprotected vaginal sex.
* Women who have experienced sexual abuse may be more likely than women with no abuse history to use drugs as a coping mechanism, have difficulty refusing unwanted sex, exchange sex for drugs, or engage in high-risk sexual activities.
* Injection drug and other substance use increase HIV risk through sharing injection equipment contaminated with HIV or engaging in high-risk behaviors, such as unprotected sex, when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
* The presence of some sexually transmitted diseases greatly increases the likelihood of acquiring or transmitting HIV. Rates of gonorrhea and syphilis are higher among women of color than among white women.
* Socioeconomic issues associated with poverty, including limited access to high-quality health care; the exchange of sex for drugs, money, or to meet other needs; and higher levels of substance use can directly or indirectly increase HIV risk factors.

What CDC Is Doing

CDC recognizes the importance of incorporating culture- and gender-relevant material into current HIV interventions. CDC has increased the availability of effective behavioral interventions for populations at increased risk for HIV infection, including women living with HIV infection or AIDS and those who are at risk for infection, by supporting research studies to develop new interventions and to adapt existing interventions. CDC also supports the national dissemination of effective HIV behavioral interventions for women. For example:

* SIHLE (Sistering, Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering) is a group-level intervention aimed at reducing risk behaviors among sexually active black teenagers aged 14–18.
* Sister to Sister is a brief, one-on-one, skills-based behavioral intervention for sexually active African American women aged 18 to 45 years to reduce sexual risk behaviors and prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.
* WILLOW (Women Involved in Life Learning from Other Women) is a social-skills building and educational intervention for adult heterosexual women, aged 18 to 50 years, living with HIV infection.

CDC also developed Take Charge. Take the Test. (TCTT), a phase of the Act Against AIDS campaign designed to increase HIV testing among African American women aged 18–34.
CDC also continues to

* Partner with organizations such as the Black Women’s Health Imperative, Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and others to address HIV among African American women through the Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative;
* Fund HIV testing and prevention programs in state and local health departments and community-based organizations;
* Be actively involved in the research of microbicides—creams or gels that can be applied vaginally or anally before sexual contact to prevent HIV transmission;
* Support clinical trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), including a recent CDC trial in Botswana which found that PrEP reduced the risk of heterosexual transmission of HIV by roughly 63% in the study group overall; and
* Work to further reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission in the US by supporting perinatal HIV prevention campaigns, enhanced surveillance for HIV-infected mothers and babies, education programs, and capacity building among health care providers and public health practitioners.

1Unless otherwise noted, this fact sheet defines women as adult and adolescent females aged 13 and older.

2New HIV infections refers to HIV incidence, or the number of people that are newly infected with HIV.

3HIV and AIDS diagnoses indicates when a person is diagnosed with HIV infection or AIDS but does not indicate when the person was infected.

4The term men who have sex with men (MSM) is used in CDC surveillance systems. It indicates the behaviors that transmit HIV infection, rather than how individuals self-identify in terms of their sexuality

5IDU is an acronym for injection drug user.

6Heterosexual contact with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
spacer
Last Modified: August 10, 2011
Last Reviewed: August 10, 2011
Content Source:
Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
"HIV among Transgender People"

http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/transgender/

Quote:
Transgender communities in the United States (US) are among the groups at highest risk for HIV infection. The term gender identity refers to a person’s basic sense of self, of identifying as male, female, or some other gender (e.g., transgender, bigender, intersex). Transgender refers to people whose gender identity does not conform to norms and expectations traditionally associated with a binary classification of gender based on external genitalia, or, more simply, their sex assigned at birth. It includes people who self-identify as gender variant; male-to-female (MtF) or transgender women; female-to-male (FtM) or transgender men; many other gender nonconforming people with identities beyond the gender binary; and people who self-identify simply as female or male. Gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation are separate, distinct concepts, none of which is necessarily linked to one’s genital anatomy.
The Numbers

Because surveillance data for this population are not uniformly collected, information is lacking on how many transgender people in the US are infected with HIV. However, data collected by local health departments and scientists studying transgender people show high HIV positivity.

* Data from CDC-funded HIV testing programs show high percentages of newly identified HIV infections among transgender people. In 2009, about 4,100 of 2.6 million HIV testing events were conducted with someone who identified as transgender. Newly identified HIV infection was 2.6% among transgender persons compared with 0.9% for males and 0.3% for females. Among transgender persons, the highest percentage of newly identified HIV infection was among blacks (4.4%) and Hispanics (2.5%). More than half (52%) of testing events with transgender persons occurred in non-clinical settings.
* In New York City, from 2005–2009, there were 206 new diagnoses of HIV infection among transgender people, 95% of which were among transgender women. Approximately 90% of MtF and FtM people newly diagnosed with HIV infection were black or Hispanic. Newly diagnosed transgender people were more likely to have been in their teens or twenties than their non-transgender counterparts. Also, among newly diagnosed people, 50% of transgender women had documentation in their medical records of substance use, commercial sex work, homelessness, incarceration, and/or sexual abuse as compared with 31% of other people who were not transgender.
* Findings from a meta-analysis of 29 published studies showed that 27.7% of transgender women tested positive for HIV infection (4 studies), but when testing was not part of the study, only 11.8% of transgender women self-reported having HIV (18 studies). In one study, 73% of the transgender women who tested HIV-positive were unaware of their status. Studies also indicate that black transgender women are more likely to become newly infected with HIV.

Prevention Challenges

Many cultural, socioeconomic, and healthrelated factors contribute to the HIV epidemic and prevention challenges in US transgender communities.

* Identifying transgender people can be challenging. Using gender alone is not enough because some people in this community do not self-identify as transgender. Using the 2-step data collection method of asking for sex assigned at birth and current gender identity increases the likelihood that all transgender people will be accurately identified. It is important to avoid making assumptions about sexual orientation and sexual behavior based on gender identity as there is great diversity in orientation and behavior among this population, and some identify as both transgender and gay, bisexual, or lesbian. The Institute of Medicine has recommended that behavioral and surveillance data for transgender men and women should be collected and analyzed separately and not grouped with data for men who have sex with men (MSM).
* High levels of HIV risk behaviors have been reported among transgender people. HIV infection among transgender women is associated with having multiple sex partners and unprotected receptive or insertive anal intercourse.
* Additionally, many transgender women reported high levels of alcohol and substance use. These substances can affect judgment and lead to unsafe sexual practices, which can increase HIV risk.
* The few studies examining HIV risk behaviors among transgender men suggest some have multiple male sex partners and engage in unprotected receptive anal or vaginal intercourse with men; however, no studies have reported links between these behaviors and HIV infection among transgender men. Nonetheless, these are established HIV risk behaviors in other populations.
* Discrimination and social stigma can hinder access to education, employment, and housing opportunities. In a study conducted in San Francisco, transgender people were more likely than MSM or heterosexual women to live in transient housing and have completed fewer years of education. Discrimination may help explain why transgender people who experience significant economic difficulties often pursue high-risk activities, including commercial sex work, to meet their basic survival needs. Social stigma also may explain why some transgender people engage in unprotected receptive intercourse with their sex partners. Qualitative data suggest that some transgender people who fear sex partner rejection or need their gender affirmed through sex may engage in unprotected receptive intercourse. High rates of depression, emotional distress, loneliness, and social isolation have been linked to suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts by transgender people. Therefore, interventions that address multiple cooccurring, syndemic public health problems— including substance use, poor mental health, violence and victimization, discrimination, and economic hardship—should be developed and evaluated for transgender people.
* Health care provider insensitivity to transgender identity or sexuality can be a barrier for HIV-infected transgender people seeking health care. Although research shows a similar proportion of HIV-positive transgender women have health insurance coverage as compared with other infected people who are not transgender, HIV-positive transgender women were less likely to be on antiretroviral therapy.
* Additional research is needed to identify factors that prevent HIV in this population. Several behavioral HIV prevention interventions developed for transgender people have been reported, generally involving relatively small samples comprised entirely or primarily of transgender women. Most have shown at least modest reductions in HIV risk behaviors, such as fewer sex partners and/or reducing unprotected anal sex acts, although none have involved a control group.

What CDC Is Doing

CDC recognizes that accurate information is key to understanding the HIV epidemic, public health needs, and gaps in services among all people at risk for HIV infection.

* In response to recommendations for collecting data from transgender people, CDC is currently revising the national system for reporting HIV cases to capture sex assigned at birth and current gender identity. This will improve the likelihood of accurately identifying diagnoses of HIV infection among transgender people.
* CDC is developing an HIV-related behavioral survey to monitor current HIV-related risk behaviors and prevention experiences among transgender women.
* CDC is currently collecting information on gender identity in its HIV testing programs.
* To respond to a shortage of proven behavioral HIV prevention interventions for the transgender community, CDC funded researchers to develop ground-breaking interventions for transgender people. Data from this research will be available later in 2011.
* CDC has funded organizations to adapt proven behavioral HIV prevention interventions for use with transgender people. Adapted curricula and supporting materials and technical assistance for implementing agencies are available.
* CDC-funded capacity building assistance (CBA) providers help community-based organizations (CBOs) serving transgender people to enhance structural interventions such as condom distribution, community mobilization, HIV testing, and coordinated referral networks and service integration.
* YMSM and YTransgender CBO Project — CDC currently funds prevention programs for transgender youth of color through the Prevention Program Branch.

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Last Modified: August 12, 2011
Last Reviewed: August 12, 2011
Content Source:
Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
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Old August 29th, 2011
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"South Florida Symposium on the National HIV/AIDS Strategy" blog.AIDS.gov 29 August 2011.

http://blog.aids.gov/2011/08/south-f...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
South Florida Symposium on the National HIV/AIDS Strategy
HIV Policy & Programs August 29, 2011

By RADM Clara H. Cobb, MSN, RN, FNP, Regional Health Administrator, Region IV, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Demonstrating their interest to learn more about and eagerness to support the implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, more than 100 stakeholders joined a symposium last month at Florida International University in Miami. Participants included representatives of local health departments, several Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grantees as well as community-based and faith-based organizations from south Florida. Colleagues from the Florida Department of Health, Miami-Dade County Department of Health Exit Disclaimer also participated.

Dr. Ronald Valdiserri, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Infectious Diseases, HHS, provided an overview of and update on the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, highlighting the goals of the Strategy: reducing new HIV infections; increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV; reducing HIV-related disparities and health inequities; and achieving a more coordinated national response to the HIV epidemic. Vanessa Johnson of the National Association of People with AIDS (NAPWA Exit Disclaimer) spoke about the importance of both the Strategy and involving people living with HIV/AIDS in planning and implementing activities that will help communities, states and the nation achieve its goals. Our colleagues from the Miami-Dade County Department of Health also discussed their Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Plan (ECHPP), developed earlier this year with support from CDC to maximize the impact of HIV prevention activities in the jurisdiction. Kira Villamizar and Robert Sandrock discussed how the department developed the plan and what initiatives they are planning to launch for specific populations as they work to implement the plan in the coming months.

The diverse group of participants then engaged in roundtable discussions about the implications of and opportunities in all of the information shared by the presenters. Through these discussions they had an opportunity to apply the Strategy’s priorities to their own organizations and align their activities with its goals. Some of the opportunities they identified were:

* Promoting HIV testing, awareness, and prevention education in non-traditional settings;
* Upon preliminary positive HIV test results, ensuring linkage to care and on-going follow-up; and
* Offering Continuing Medical Education (CME) to encourage infectious disease physicians from diverse racial, ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds to participate in continuous HIV/AIDS education and provide improved HIV services.

In these discussions, participants also identified potential barriers to implementing particular changes. Fortunately, there is wisdom in groups and by sharing expertise and insights from different perspectives they also were able to identify tactics to overcome those possible obstacles.

The participants, presenters and organizers all came away with a wealth of information about the Strategy and local implementation opportunities as well as a strengthened shared commitment to contribute to the national effort to realize the Strategy’s important goals.

Michelle Davis, Regional Health Administrator, Region II; Angelica Ramirez, Regional Resource Coordinator, Region II; and Jacqueline Taylor, Public Health Analyst, Region IV collaborated in convening this meeting and coauthored this post.



Posted in: HIV Policy & Programs, National HIV/AIDS Strategy, Strategy in Action
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"Community Engagement in NIAID’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks" blog.AIDS.gov 29 September 2011.

http://liveweb.archive.org/http://bl...og.AIDS.gov%29

Quote:
By Carl Dieffenbach, Ph.D., Director of the Division of AIDS, NIAID

Since early in the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has involved community representatives and advocates in the research process. The nature and scope of the community’s involvement have grown over the years, but the rationale behind these efforts remains the same: the people who might benefit from the research should have a voice in the process, and community engagement helps ensure that the research is both relevant and ethical. While there are many ways to establish community-researcher partnerships, the Community Advisory Board (CAB) model is the primary way in which NIAID and its funded researchers work together with interested, nonscientific community representatives.

NIAID established its first CAB in 1990 in response to HIV/AIDS activists’ demands, and soon thereafter, CABs became a requirement for each of the NIAID-funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks and sites. Currently, there are 138 CABs that interact with one or more of the NIAID-funded clinical trials sites. The CABs facilitate a two-way dialogue between the research staff and the broader community. This serves to increase community understanding of why a given trial may be conducted – what researchers hope to learn and how it fits into the overall research plan. The exchange also helps research staff gain insight into community needs, concerns and culture, which can facilitate more effective and meaningful communication with the broader community, and may enable staff to better assess the importance and feasibility of any given study in that community. In addition to the local CABs, each of NIAID’s six HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks has a CAB with global representation. These CABs interact with the scientific leadership and provide input into the scientific agenda, network operations, and the prioritization and design of specific studies.

When the HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks were restructured in 2006, NIAID established a cross-network group called Community Partners (CP) whose goal is to help ensure effective representation of and timely communication among the global communities where the clinical trials networks operate. This group also works to 1) harmonize best practices for community involvement across the HIV/AIDS networks and affiliated sites, 2) identify the communities’ scientific priorities, and 3) develop effective training tools and evaluation measures.

NIAID has several other means of fostering community engagement. Since 2006, the NIAID HIV Vaccine Research Education Initiative (NHVREI) has worked to increase awareness of and engagement in HIV vaccine research among highly HIV-affected populations within the United States, and more recently has begun to address other prevention research. Through partnerships with local community-based organizations and national and regional non-governmental organizations and associations, NHVREI works to improve knowledge of and attitudes toward HIV vaccine research, enhance partnerships between communities and researchers, and create support for current and future HIV vaccine trials. Since this project is winding down, NIAID has established a way to ensure that the important work of the NHVREI not only continues but also expands to fully encompass other biomedical prevention research, such as microbicides and pre-exposure prophylaxis.

The Legacy Project, which began within the HIV Vaccine Trials Network, is now a project that spans all six clinical trials networks. The Legacy Project works to build trust within communities in the United States that have been historically distrustful of and underrepresented in clinical trials research, namely African Americans and Latinos. Coordinated by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, the Legacy Project strives to ensure cultural competency and responsiveness of research by developing partnerships with key stakeholders in these communities.

As the clinical trials networks are restructured in 2013, NIAID will continue to encourage and support community engagement activities through the CABs, CP and the partnerships developed through the Legacy Project and projects like the NHVREI. NIAID remains committed to increasing the community’s understanding and awareness of HIV/AIDS biomedical research and ensuring that the community always has a seat at the table.

Posted in: Clinical Trials, NIAID, Research
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